Listener Messages to the NPR Phone Line

April 8th, 2010 in Archive by 3 Comments

We opened up a Hidden World of Girls story phone line with NPR and asked you to call with your stories, tips, and suggestions. Here is a sample of some of the calls that have come in so far. Do you have a story to tell? Call 202-408-9576.

_____________

My name is Jessica Delfino. I grew up in a very small town called Damariscotta, Maine, the oldest of six sisters. I ran away from home at about age 15 and never ever went back. I put myself though art school go-go dancing. Eventually, armed with a guitar and a very big mouth, I wrote a bunch of edgy, sassy songs about life, love and the female anatomy. People either love or hate what I do.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Lori Brix. After the Second World War the Queen Mary was utilized to bring an entire boatload of British war brides to the United States to be reunited with their husbands. And my mother, who is still living, was among the women on that boat.  The boat was met by military and escorted to the harbor into New York by the Statue of Liberty and there was a big reception for all of them.  As they arrived there was a big military band, and hundreds, thousands of men waiting.  As the woman’s name would be called, she would go down the gang plank.  She would see the crowd, someone elbowing their way to the front, jumping across the barricade, picking up their bride and twirling her around with a big kiss.  My mother said she had never seen my father in civilian clothing until that moment.  Some women came to the bottom of the gangplank and there was no one there to meet them, they were going to be spread all across the country.  These women left their homeland with the sense that you would not be traveling back and forth, you would not have the ability to call back and forth, it would be a complete rupture from their home country.  They literally were coming pretty much with the shirts on their backs and few personal belongings to start a brand new life in America.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

This is a story about my aunt.  She’s now almost 70. When she retired from teaching, she bought a sailboat, took her boat and decided she was going to sail around the world, and has since crossed the Atlantic several times, and now she’s out on a 40-ft slough named Wonderland, soon to head to the Panama Canal to the Pacific.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Alisa Starkweather.  I am here to tell you that I have been doing rites of passage work for 25 years. I’ve established a red tent temple movement so we could mentor our young girls all across the world.  Also the women’s belly and womb conference.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Ginger Swope.  My story is about my friend Mary Pierce Brosmer who started Women Writing for a Change nearly 20 years ago.  She had a dream of a group of women writing together around a table covered with a lace tablecloth of her mothers.  She started a school for women writers, for women to come together and write their words to be heard in a safe environment.  That school is now in over 12 cities in the United States.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

Hi my name is Jessica Nyamagucha.  In my husband’s country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, rape is being used as a weapon of war.  Last year I was working at an all-girls school, in Bethesda Maryland, and I shared with the young women there what was going on in my husband’s country.  And one of these young women decided that it would be a good idea for all of the girls in the school to write cards who had been victims of sexual abuse in the Congo.  We collected over 100 cards, all written in French.  My husband finally got back to the Eastern side of the Congo and made a trip out to one of the clinics that’s operating now to take care of the victims of rape, and he just delivered all of these cards written by American girls.  He told me that, more than money, more than anyone’s given so far, women cried over these because they were so touched to see that people elsewhere, women like there elsewhere know what’s going on.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Mariel Chenier.  I am my mother’s only caretaker, which does not lend to any normal 9-5 job, so I decided to develop a home business and just launched a green, eco-friendly pet toy business, specializing in handmade wool and cashmere pet toys. Opalina’s Boutique.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Maya, I live in Oakland.  I want to tell you about my struggle with bulimia, which is a very secretive part of my experience of growing up.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

_____________

My name is Vashti Dubois, and I’m 49 years old. I grew up in Brownsville, Brooklyn, a poor neighborhood.  And at the age of 12 I got a scholarship to a private high school in Brooklyn Heights, and at the age of 13 my mother put me out of the house. One of the things that kept me moving forward was school.  I discovered theater.  It gave me a way of connecting.  I got a scholarship to Wesleyan University.  [Later] I got the opportunity to become the director of The Girl Center, which was a program for adjudicated delinquent girls between the ages of 13 and 17.  What is so profound is how powerful these young women were and how dysfunctional the juvenile was in dealing with girls.  The other extraordinary thing for me was I had an opportunity to go back to a pivotal moment in my own girlhood, the moment when my mother put me out and I had to figure out how I was going to live, and I was meeting these young women at that moment in their own lives.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Popularity: 1%

3 Comments

WOw… what a wonderful thing to recognize the strong women out there… so much of what we women do is kind of forgotten about as we struggle along with work and raising our families… ever the multi-taskers….

We really are pretty special. We are pretty damn amazing.

Heather

4/9/2010

Thank you for sharing your powerful stories with us.

Sarah

4/9/2010

beautiful

kathleen

4/10/2010

Leave a Reply

Funding for this series comes from:

National Endowment for the Arts National Endowment for the Arts Corporation for Public Broadcasting

Further Support Provided By:

NPR Kitchen Sisters

FOLLOW US

Hidden World of Girls on Twitter Hidden World of Girls on Flickr Hidden World of Girls on Facebook
Hidden World of Girls via RSS Kitchen Sisters on Vimeo Hidden World of Girls Podcast Hidden World of Girls on YouTube

Archives