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Dieter Kosslick’s Last Red Carpet Ride

Dieter Kosslick’s Last Red Carpet Ride

Our New Podcast Collaboration with the Goethe-Institut

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Ask anyone who’s been to The Berlin Film Festival—The Berlinale they call it—what they remember most about it. Maybe it’s the scale—some 400 films across 14 theaters across 10 days. Maybe it’s the weather—the Festival unfolds across the first weeks of February and Berlin’s piercing cold is legend—but I bet money most will tell you what they remember most is Dieter Kosslick in his black fedora and red wool scarf on the red carpet at theaters around the city welcoming filmmakers and filmgoers from around the globe to their screenings—screenings that provoke, pay homage, compete, ignite.

Dieter is one of the film world’s most gregarious, hilarious and controversial film festival directors. He’s put his stamp on this legendary festival for 18 years and kicked up some dust in the process. This most recent festival, the 69th Berlinale, was Dieter’s last.

Along with Dieter, some of the voices heard in this podcast include Agnés Varda, Juliette Binoche, Rajendra Roy, Alice Waters, Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser, Mick Jagger and more.

Here, for The Big Pond, Dieter Kosslick’s Last Red Carpet Ride, Produced by The Kitchen Sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandi Howell and mixed by Jim McKee.

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Special Thanks | Danke Schoen: Dieter Kosslick, Agnès Varda, Tom Luddy, Tommy Struck, Thomas Hailer, Juliette Binoche, Rajendra Roy, Sandra Schulberg, Alice Waters, Michael Barker, Rudolf Biermann, Mick Jagger, Bee Thiam Tan, Alain Gomis, Dian Sastrowardoyo, Eric Schlosser, Michael Pollan, Alberto Barbera, Daniela Michel, Ute Roche, Julie Huntsinger, Martin Böttcher, Kronos Quartet, DJ Spooky,Ted Saverese, yMusic & Judd Greenstein, Blue Dot Sessions. Staff at The Berlinale: Laura Brandes, Julia Boxler, Sabine Gebauer, Kerstin Bückert and the many people at The Festival who helped make this podcast possible. At the Goethe-Institut: Verena Hütter, Dario Radisic, William Gilcher & Savannah Beck.

“Weeding is Fundamental” #KeeperoftheDay

“Weeding is Fundamental” #KeeperoftheDay

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On the latest episode of 99% Invisible, a story from San Francisco, and the controversial purging of books from library shelves—or weeding as it’s called in the biz—after the 1989 earthquake. This episode also includes our story The Pack Horse Librarians of Eastern Kentucky from The Keepers series. Two library stories in one. Listen up.

C.B. “Stubb” Stubblefield #KeeperoftheDay

C.B. “Stubb” Stubblefield #KeeperoftheDay

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On the latest episode of The Kitchen Sisters Present… we celebrate National Barbecue Month with stories of C.B. “Stubb” Stubblefield: legendary BBQ man, sauce master, keeper of community, keeper of the flame, archangel of BBQ.”>The Kitchen Sisters Present… we celebrate National Barbecue Month with stories about CB “Stubb” Stubblefield: legendary BBQ man, sauce master, keeper of community, keeper of the flame, archangel of BBQ.

Scott Carrier #KeeperoftheDay

Scott Carrier #KeeperoftheDay

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Scott Carrier is one of our favorite producers. You’ve probably heard his stories on This American Life and All Things Considered. His voice, his storytelling style. They’re unique and memorable and compelling. On the latest episode of our podcast, The Kitchen Sisters Present… we’re thrilled to bring you a story from his podcast, Home of the Brave. A story from below the border in Chamelecon, Honduras.

Eric Klinenberg, Author of Palaces for the People #KeeperoftheDay

Eric Klinenberg, Author of Palaces for the People #KeeperoftheDay

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The latest episode of The Kitchen Sisters Present… is a re-broadcast from the New York Public Library’s podcast, The Librarian Is In, featuring Eric Klinenberg, author of Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life.

Klinenberg believes that the future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, bookstores, churches, synagogues places where people gather and linger, making friends across group lines and strengthening the entire community. He calls this the “social infrastructure.” When it is strong, neighborhoods flourish; when it is neglected, as it has been in recent years, families and individuals must fend for themselves.

Thomas Alva Edison #KeeperoftheDay

Thomas Alva Edison #KeeperoftheDay

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#KeeperoftheDay – Thomas Alva Edison, born this day in 1847.

Look around your daily life. There’s a little piece of Thomas Edison almost everywhere. Your desk lamp. That x-ray you got when you broke your arm. The battery in your car. The movie you saw last night. The recording of this story that you’re about to hear… Listen to The Rise and Fall and Rise and Fall and Rise of Thomas Alva Edison.

Library Bytegeist #KeeperoftheDay

Library Bytegeist #KeeperoftheDay

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Our latest podcast episode, The Dark Side of the Dewey Decimal System, is a collaboration with another podcast, Library Bytegeist, “a collection of stories from the front lines and fringes of libraries,” hosted by Molly Schwartz and brought to you by the Metropolitan New York Library Council.

Take a listen to our collaboration:

And here’s an episode featuring Sister Nikki:

The Dark Side of the Dewey Decimal System #KeeperoftheDay

The Dark Side of the Dewey Decimal System #KeeperoftheDay

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This week on The Kitchen Sisters Present… podcast, we take a look at the Dark Side of the Dewey Decimal System…

Melvil Dewey, the father of library science and the inventor of the most popular library classification system in the world, was a known racist and serial sexual harasser. Forced out of the American Library Association, which he co-founded, his 19th century worldview and biases are reflected in the classification system that libraries around the world have inherited.

Molly Schwartz of the Metropolitan New York Library Council and producer of the podcast Library Bytegeist visits Bard High School Early College in Queens to find out about how students there are rebelling against the Dewey Decimal System. She also talks with Greg Cotton (Cornell College), Barbara Fister (Gustavus Adolphus College), and Dorothy Berry (Umbra Search Project).

Georgia Gilmore & the Club from Nowhere #KeeperoftheDay

Georgia Gilmore & the Club from Nowhere #KeeperoftheDay

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#KeeperoftheDay – Georgia Gilmore & the Club from Nowhere

In honor of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr, we reprise the story of Georgia Gilmore and her secret civil rights kitchen.

In the 1950s, a group of Montgomery, Alabama women baked goods to help fund the Montgomery bus boycott. Known as the Club from Nowhere the group was led by Georgia Gilmore, one of the unsung heroes of the civil rights era.

William R. Ferris Collection #KeeperoftheDay

William R. Ferris Collection #KeeperoftheDay

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William Ferris grew up on a farm in Warren County, Mississippi in the 1940s and 50s. The Ferris family, the only white family on the farm, worked side by side with African Americans in the fields. As a teenager he began documenting his neighbors’ lives, the Sunday gospel singers at Rose Hill Church, the blues musicians living near the home — including the soon-to-be well-known Mississippi Fred McDowell.

His thousands of photographs, films, and sound-recordings of interviews and music performances are now online: the William R. Ferris Collection, 1910s-2016, part of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina. And Bill went on to become a prolific author, folklorist, filmmaker, and chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. But the inspiration for his many accomplishments remains his rural farm community.

Read more and listen to the podcast: Episode #107: William Ferris: Keeper of Southern Folklife.