Archives

November, 2016
Giving Tuesday / So Many Untold Stories to Tell

Giving Tuesday / So Many Untold Stories to Tell

emmett-polaroid-2

Dear Friends,

On #GivingTuesday, we’d like to give you a story.

Some fifty years ago, Guy Tyler, an amateur ethnographer from Los Angeles drove out to the Colorado River Indian Reservation in Parker, Arizona with his portable reel-to-reel tape recorder and began recording Emmett Van Fleet, the last of the Mojave Creation Song Singers. Over the course of several years, Tyler spent his weekends and holidays meticulously recording the 525 song cycle that recounts the legend of the creation and origin of the Mojave people. Lost for decades, these recordings became the key for the Mojave to be able to map the boundaries of their tribal lands and fight the building of a nuclear waste site on their sacred sites.

With Standing Rock in our hearts and the events of 2016 on our minds, we are committed now more than ever to telling stories from the margins, stories from voices that might otherwise not be heard.

Listen to “House of Night: The Lost Creation Songs of the Mojave People”

Your support keeps the stories turning. Thank you so much for giving.

Our best,

Davia & Nikki
The Kitchen Sisters

donate-2016-givingtuesday-175-3

Episode 59: Weenie Royale: The Impact of the Internment on Japanese American Cooking

Episode 59: Weenie Royale: The Impact of the Internment on Japanese American Cooking

Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes | Stitcher | RSS

wr1

During World War II, In desolate inland internment camps in the US, like Manzanar, Topaz, and Tule Lake, some 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans were incarcerated for the duration of the war— their traditional food replaced by US government commodities and war surplus — hotdogs, ketchup, spam, potatoes — erasing the traditional Japanese diet and family table.

Akemi Tamaribuchi, a third generation Japanese American, artist Howard Ikemoto, Berkeley graduate Tami Takahashi, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, author of “Farewell to Manzanar,” Jimi Yamaichi of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and George “Sulu” Takei of Star Trek, talk about how the internment forever impacted their lives, their food and their family table.

Kitchen Sisters Interviewing, Recording & Podcasting Workshop, Dec 8 in SF

Kitchen Sisters Interviewing, Recording & Podcasting Workshop, Dec 8 in SF

KSworkshop800

Time again for The Kitchen Sisters Recording, Interviewing & Podcasting Workshop. Davia Nelson is holding a new one on Thursday, December 8 at Francis Coppola’s historic Zoetrope building in San Francisco. This three-hour session is designed for those who want to acquire and hone their skills for radio, podcasts, film, documentaries, storytelling, oral histories, family histories, news, and other multimedia platforms.

The Workshop covers interviewing and mic’ing techniques, sound gathering, use of archival audio, field recording techniques, recording equipment, how to make interviewees comfortable, how to frame evocative questions that make for compelling storytelling, how to build a story, how to pitch a story, how to create a podcast, how to listen.

The session is customized to fit the projects you are working on. So come ready to talk about your stories and ideas too. People who have attended in the past have come from radio, film, multimedia, detective agencies, farms, music, newspapers, journalism, photography, oral history, historical societies, ophthalmology, writing, libraries, archives, web design, restaurants, health care organizations, cheese-making and beyond.

The groups are always lively and surprising and good contacts are made.

Morning Workshop: 10:00 – 1:00pm / Afternoon Workshop: 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

Cost: $150

Come in the morning or come in the afternoon, just sign up for one.

The workshop is in North Beach at 916 Kearny St. on the 6th floor. Of course snacks from Cafe Zoetrope will be served.

Expand your skills, meet new people, support the work of The Kitchen Sisters.

REGISTER NOW.

Fugitive Waves Episode #58 – The Kiosk Strategy

Fugitive Waves Episode #58 – The Kiosk Strategy

Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes | Stitcher | RSS

Kiosk-Stamps-1650-1653

A story from the plazas of Portugal, where small ornate kiosks that served traditional snacks and drinks once graced the city and brought people together. Neglected by time and pushed into abandonment by a dictator’s regime that suppressed public conversation and gathering, this tradition is now being revived, drawing people back to public space.

For more than a century, Lisbon’s public spaces were graced by beautiful Art Nouveau and Moorish-style kiosks — small, ornate structures that provided chairs and shade and served traditional Portuguese snacks and drinks.

These quiosques de refrescos (refreshment kiosks) were the heart of public life in the city. But, under the long dictatorship of Prime Minister António de Oliveira Salazar, which started in the 1930s, laws actually discouraged public gathering and conversation. Many restaurants closed down and the kiosks ­­fell into disrepair and all but disappeared.

That was, until Catarina Portas, a native of Lisbon, former journalist and entrepreneur stepped in.

“From the 19th to the 20th century, there were some hundred different kiosks in Lisbon. The city was full of them in different colors, different designs,” says Portas. She used to take walks around the city and see these sad, abandoned structures. She said, “I started to think, how could we bring this to our times?”

Portas began hunting down these kiosks — some still in place but boarded up, others in storage. She teamed up with architect João Regal to restore the buildings – not just to their former glory, but to their former place of prominence in Lisbon’s public spaces.

“We went to the city council with amazing photographs of the old kiosks, and we prepared all the old drinks and made them taste the drinks,” Portas says. The pitch worked —­­ Portas is fairly sure it was the drinks that convinced the council members. Their first three kiosks opened in 2009.

The kiosks offer affordable and traditional drinks and snacks, conversation and community – and also employment in a country struggling with the staggering levels of unemployment and a recession gripping much of western Europe.

Read more.